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Comprehensible and Compelling: The Causes and Effects of Free Voluntary Reading-Paperback-Libraries Unlimited-The Library Marketplace

Comprehensible and Compelling: The Causes and Effects of Free Voluntary Reading

Libraries Unlimited

  • $45.00


by Stephen D. Krashen, Sy-Ying Lee, and Christy Lao

9781440857980

106 pages

6 1/8" x 9 1/4"

Human beings acquire language when we understand what we hear or read, but acquisition happens best when the input is highly interesting, or compelling. This book explains how to apply this principle to make free voluntary reading a powerful tool for literacy development.

A joint effort from three thought leaders in educational research, linguistics, and literacy acquisition, this book explores the latest research that shows that compelling comprehensive input (CCI) is the baseline for all language and literacy development.

It has been established that encouraging reading at all student levels supports literacy—not just literacy in terms of having basic reading and writing abilities, but in being able to perform advanced reading as well as having well-developed listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills. But what kind of reading has the most benefit for young learners? And why? Comprehensible and Compelling: The Causes and Effects of Free Voluntary Reading examines the most recent research and literacy testing results from around the world that document how reading materials must be comprehensible and compelling to bring success. It also presents research findings that show how libraries directly support literacy development, providing arguments and proof that will be invaluable in advocacy efforts for funding and program development.

Features

  • Addresses and interprets current international research on literacy development
  • Documents the value of libraries in providing access for literacy development
  • Provides compelling research-based arguments for reading aloud, free voluntary reading, and reading to one's strengths
  • Identifies and explains the three stages in the development of the highest level of literacy: hearing stories, self-selected recreational reading, and specialized reading in an area of deep personal interest

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